Tag Archives: Apple’s Trust Score

Early Warning: “Providing advanced notice of some impending event or development”

If the world hates you, know that it has hated Me before it hated you.  If you were of the world, the world would love you as its own; but because you are not of the world, but I chose you out of the world, therefore the world hates you…If they persecuted Me, they will also persecute you.  If they kept My word, they will also keep yours.  But all these things they will do to you on account of My name, because they do not know Him who sent Me.  John 15:18-21

I have said all these things to you to keep you from falling away.  They will put you out of the synagogues.  Indeed, the hour is coming when whoever kills you will think he is offering service to God.  And they will do these things because they have not known the Father, nor me.  But I have said these things to you, that when their hour comes you may remember that I told them to you.  John 16:1-4

I’m not normally a conspiracy theorist, but sometimes I catch wind of things that make my spiritual antennae go up.  This last week was one of those times, and I felt led to pass it on.  I have an I Phone, an I Pad, and a Mac Book Pro.  Hence, I use I Tunes (Maybe not much longer after this article).  In the IOS 12 update, there is this new “Device Trust Score” that seems rather odd to me.  Check out this article from Venture Beat:

Apple’s promise of transparency regarding user data means that any new privacy policy update might reveal that it’s doing something new and weird with your data. Alongside yesterday’s releases of iOS 12, tvOS 12, and watchOS 5, Apple quietly updated some of its iTunes Store terms and privacy disclosures, including one standout provision: It’s now using an abstracted summary of your phone calls or emails as an anti-fraud measure.

The provision appears in the iTunes Store & Privacy windows of iOS and tvOS devices:

I Tunes Trust Policy

 

This provision is unusual for a few reasons, perhaps the least of which is that Apple TVs don’t make phone calls or send emails. As such, it’s unclear how Apple computes the device trust score for iTunes purchases made through Apple TVs, but there’s other potential “information about how you use your device” that could be scraped and abstracted…

It’s equally unclear how recording and tracking the number of calls or emails traversing a user’s iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch would better enable Apple to verify a device’s identity than just checking its unique device identifier. Every one of these devices has both hardcoded serial numbers and advertising identifiers, while iPhones and cellular iPads also have SIM cards with other device-specific codes.

Citing personal privacy concerns, Apple has said that it’s unwilling to share users’ private data, notably including phone call logs, even under foreign government demands — except under proper legal process. While transmitting and storing an abstracted number of emails or phone calls doesn’t come close to full call or email records, it’s an odd metric to rely upon as an anti-fraud measure.

This would not have bothered me as much if I hadn’t of just read this article by Megan Palin a week or so before, from the New York Post, (Sept. 19, 2018):

China’s chilling dictatorship is moving quickly to introduce social scorecards by which all citizens will be monitored 24/7 and ranked on their behavior.

The Communist Party’s plan is for every one of its 1.4 billion citizens to be at the whim of a dystopian social credit system, and it’s on track to be fully operational by the year 2020.

An active pilot program has already seen millions of people each assigned a score out of 800 and either reap its benefits or suffer its consequences — depending on which end of the scale they sit.

Under the social credit scheme, points are lost and gained based on readings from a sophisticated network of 200 million surveillance cameras — a figure set to triple in 18 months.

The program has been enabled by rapid advances in facial recognition, body scanning and geo-tracking.

The data is combined with information collected from individuals’ government records — including medical and educational — along with their financial and internet browsing histories. Overall scores can go up and down in “real time” dependent on the person’s behavior, but they can also be affected by people they associate with.

“If your best friend or your dad says something negative about the government, you’ll lose points too,” the Australian Broadcasting Company (ABC) reports.

The mandatory “social credit” system was first announced in 2014 in a bid to reinforce the notion that “keeping trust is glorious and breaking trust is disgraceful,” according to a government document.

In an episode on the ABC’s “Foreign Correspondent,” financial credit system Jie Cong, Tianjin general manager for financial credit system Alipay, summarized the system in black and white.

“If people keep their promises they can go anywhere in the world,” he said. “If people break their promises they won’t be able to move an inch.”

Under the system, those deemed to be “top citizens” are rewarded bonus points.

The benefits of being ranked on the higher end of the scale include waived deposits on hotels and rental cars, VIP treatment at airports, discounted loans, priority job applications and fast-tracking to the most prestigious universities.

Dandan, a young mother and marketing professional, is proud of her high score. If she keeps it up her infant son will be more likely to get into a top school.

“China likes to experiment in this creative way…I think people in every country want a stable and safe society,” she said.

“We need a social credit system. We hope we can help each other, love each other and help everyone to become prosperous.”

Now you might become a little jumpy when both China and Apple use the same verbage: “Trust Score.”  Hmmm.  So, dig a little further and you can read a host of articles about how China and Apple have been linked because it is so much cheaper to produce I Phones in China, saving Apple billions of dollars.  

This is one such article from The Daily Caller.  Writers Lieberman and Pickrell write about how Apple “contributes to the suppression of human rights and internet freedom” to become the ninth largest company in the world (not just tech company, company of any kind).  

• So it is no coincidence that the “Trust Score” rating in China begins to bleed into the United States via the Apple Company.  

Once again, perhaps it is time for me to get rid of my Apple devices!  Jesus warned us of this time over 2000 years ago, so don’t be surprised by it.

But I have said these things to you, that when their hour comes you may remember that I told them to you.  John 16:4