Tag Archives: Hebrews

Be Strengthened by Grace

strengthened by grace.jpg

Do not be led astray by diverse and strange teachings, for it is good for the heart to be strengthened by grace…  Hebrews 13:9

My last devotion was about not missing the grace of God because a root of bitterness springs up in you or someone around you.  This root can pull you away with a stubborn and cold heart and produces poisonous and bitter fruit, as Deuteronomy 29:18 warns.

But today, let’s think about how to experience the grace of God and have it actually strengthen us.  There are three things I can think of today that can pull someone away from grace.  I’m sure there are dozens, but let’s start with three.

  1. Thinking that how I’m doing as a Christian is about my performance and measuring up.  Christians my parents’ age seem to have been caught up in what looks good, whether it had meaning or not.  You had to do the right thing, go to every event there was because it wouldn’t ‘look good’ if you didn’t. The Christian life was one of duty and striving to measure up.  It ends up with a ‘see me’ mentality, because if I’m going to wear myself doing these things, I better get the credit for it somewhere.
  2. Strange and diverse teachings of today.  There are so many rabbit trails out there that you can go down that might seem exciting or where it’s at, but don’t really bring you closer to Jesus and what He has for you.  Some might be into the fulness of the Holy Spirit, others into end times, yet others into finding our Jewish roots, and on it goes.
  3. Getting defeated by sin, causing the Christian life to be an impossible roller coaster of some success, but more failure.  The result here is guilt, shame, not even trying to measure up and then going back to your old life.

I won’t want to linger here, because I want to get to ways for your heart to be strengthened by grace.  I’ll stick with three again.

  1. Get off of the performance leash.  Don’t let others control you.  Learn to play to the audience of One: Jesus.  Learn to hear His voice and find confidence in letting what He’s directing you dictate what you get involved in, and where you go.  What others think of you doesn’t matter really, it is what God thinks of you.  If you are living in honest obedience to Him, then cut the leash.
  2. Just get hooked on Jesus.  Take getaways with just your Bible and a notebook, maybe even no food so it doesn’t distract you.  Don’t let up until you’ve gotten through all of the distractions to just be with the lover of your soul.  In John 13:25 we see that John leaned against Jesus’ bosom.  Get that close to Him that you can feel what He feels and you see yourself and others through His eyes.
  3. Understand that your salvation is by grace alone.  It is a gift of God, meaning that you didn’t earn this salvation, God gave it to you.  He took the scales off of your eyes.  When you bring your sins to Him, He throws them as far away as the east is from the west.  You can live in freedom and hold your head high.  You don’t have to listen to the voice of the enemy that either speaks to your mind or through others’ lips.  They are words like, “You’re no good,” “remember all of the rotten things you’ve done,” and “it’s all your fault.”  You are loved, you are free, God has good plans for you and He is well pleased with you.  He is doing a work in you that will sand off the rough edges, so let Him and it will be good.

Let your heart be strengthened today by God’s grace.  Revel in what He has done for you, rest in His presence and lean up against Jesus’ bosom whenever you can.  Grace to you!

 


Don’t Miss Grace

grab grace.jpg

See to it that no one fails to obtain the grace of God; that no “root of bitterness” springs up and causes trouble, and by it many become defiled.  Hebrews 12:15

Hebrews 12 begins by talking about setting aside sin and fixing our eyes on Jesus.  In 12:4 it says, “In your struggle against sin you have not yet resisted to the point of shedding your blood.”  It continues by explaining that if we are disciplined by the Lord, it means we are His children.  Verse 11 declares that if we submit to God’s discipline we will “yield the peaceful fruit of righteousness, for those who have been trained by it.”

If we don’t  set aside our sins and weights, resisting to the point of great pain, and if we don’t submit to God’s warning lights, a few things could result.  One is that we continue to run, but we are so weighed down that the Christian life is a burden and a chore.  Another is that we experience God’s spankings over and over until we learn our lesson.  God will discipline His children until they are trained by it.  A third option is that we fail to obtain the grace of God, which sounds awful.

“Failing to obtain the grace of God” could mean that those who never submit to the commands and path to holiness that God gives us really are not believers.  They could be called “professing Christians,” who think they are secure because they go to church or because of some past spiritual experience or good work.  Hebrews is written to those people, urging them to not be presumptuous about their standing with God.

“The root of bitterness” really isn’t about not taking care of resentment and festering bitterness in your heart, though that’s a good thing to do.  It is a reference to Deuteronomy 29:18 that states: “Beware lest there be among you a man…whose heart turns away from this day from the Lord our God to go and serve the gods of those nations; lest there be among you a root bearing poisonous and bitter fruit.”

How can this root of bitterness and unbelief spring up in a body of believers and defile many?  Deut. 29:10 answers this by describing “one who, when he hears the words of this sworn covenant, blesses himself in his heart, saying, ‘I shall be safe, though I walk in the stubbornness of my heart.’”

You could be pressing into God, yearning to be set free from the ugly consequences of sin that has wreaked havoc in your life, coming to church with an attitude of worship and desperacy.  And then you sit by a person who is rarely moved to sing or worship, that never really has read the Bible, doesn’t bear fruit in keeping with repentance, and who kind of communicates to you to ‘knock it off.’

Don’t let their stubborn and unbelieving heart deter or defile you.  Grab a hold of the grace of God by setting aside your sins and weights, resisting sin to the point of great personal pain and loss, and submitting to God’s hand of discipline.  Pursue holiness so that you may enjoy God’s grace, yielding a peaceful fruit of righteousness.

*Image from Mick Holt


Losing spiritual weight

freedom

Therefore, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us also lay aside every weight, and sin which clings so closely, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us.  Hebrews 12:1

Years ago I was an adult leader at a youth rally.  The speaker sent teens and adults off for a half an hour, arming us with a spiritual inventory to take.  It was like a checklist of questions related to obtaining a clean heart.  It was a chance to see if we were carrying around sins and weights that were bogging us down, and then getting them right before God.

What happened next was awesome.  We regrouped and teenagers began to get up, confessing their sins that they knew God was speaking to them about leaving behind.  Kid after kid got up in tears, voluntarily and  moved by the Spirit, and renounced things.  I’ve not been in such a revival like setting before or after, where people were so visibly moved to be free.  Psalm 66:18-19 is sobering: “If I had cherished sin in my heart, the Lord would not have listened; but God has surely listened and heard my voice in prayer.”

There is freedom in finding a clean heart, but it is not easy.  The reason it’s not easy is that it takes the power of the Holy Spirit to overcome our own pride, unforgiveness, and stubborn sin habits.  A couple of years ago I lost over forty pounds.  What freedom to get rid of that weight!  Involved in that process was totally changing my eating habits and sticking to consistent exercise.

To put Hebrews 12:1 into practice may mean a radical change in spiritual and emotional habits.  Sometimes the things that weigh us down aren’t sins, they are just unhealthy spiritual and physical habits or things that zap our love for God and our devotion to Him.  It is like what Luke 8:14 describes from the parable of the sower: “And as for what fell among the thorns, they are those who hear, but as they go on their way they are choked by the cares (of this world) and riches and pleasures of life, and their fruit does not mature.”  Life’s worries, the deceitfulness or seductiveness of riches, and the pursuit of fun are weights that certainly can get in the way of running after Jesus.

Some checklist questions could include:

  • Are there any cares of life that rob your peace and joy?
  • Is your joy found in things other than Jesus and His Word?
  • What would you have a hard time fasting from or giving up for the sake of having a closer walk with Jesus?
  • Is there anything that occupies more of your free time and money than it should?
  • Do you listen to any music, watch any TV shows/movies, or read any books that you seek satisfaction from that either might be ungodly, or competes with your finding satisfaction from God?
  • Are there any unconfessed sins that you secretly harbor?
  • Are there any unresolved conflicts or relationships where you have wronged someone, and it needs to be made right?
  • Are there resentments against certain people or situations that have led to bitterness, rage and malice?  (Malice is the intention or desire to hurt someone else; ill will.)
  • Are you overly concerned about yourself, having most of your conversations and thoughts centering around “I”?  Or are your feelings easily hurt?
  • Do you gossip or talk unkindly about others?
  • Do you cheat, steal, cut corners, exaggerate, or stretch the truth as a habit?
  • Are you undisciplined, lazy, or neglectful of family duties or spiritual habits?
  • Do you have a stubborn heart, or an unteachable attitude?

Clear out some time alone with God and pray the prayer of Psalm 139: 23-24, “Search me, O God, and know my heart!  Try me and know my thoughts!  And see if there be any grievous way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting!”


Mind Verbs

Moses

By faith, Moses, when he was grown up, refused to be called the son of Pharaoh’s daughter, choosing rather to be mistreated with the people of God than to enjoy the fleeting pleasures of sin.  He considered the reproach of Christ greater wealth than the treasures of Egypt for he was looking to the reward.  By faith he left Egypt, not being afraid of the anger of the king, for he endured as seeing Him who is invisible.  Hebrews 11:24-27

Do you have life verses?  Is it hard to just center in one or two?  Well, these verses are in my top three of verses that have been my anchors throughout my journey of faith, one which began over 50 years ago.  There have been up’s and there have been down’s.  There have been many victories and there have been some defeats.  I look back at the tough times when I just had to hang on to promises from the Word, pray and wait.  The mind verbs in these verses just ring in my head.

My experience is that the emotion of following Jesus can wear thin, even get ugly.  Good old Dr. Seuss has some wisdom in his book, “Oh the Place You Will Go.”

You’ll pass the whole gang and you’ll soon take the lead. Wherever you fly, you’ll be best of the best.  Wherever you go, you will top all the rest.  Except when you don’t. Because, sometimes, you won’t.  I’m sorry to say so but, sadly, it’s true that Bang-ups and Hang-ups can happen to you.  You can get all hung up  in a prickle-ly perch.  And your gang will fly on. You’ll be left in a Lurch.  You’ll come down from  the Lurch with an unpleasant bump.  And the chances are, then, that you’ll be in a Slump.

When you get in the slump, or when you are at forks in the road, facing value decisions, temptations, opposition, or  the wait of faith, get these mind verbs front and center.  Verbs are action words, like run, skip or hop.  These are mental actions words.  What we are anchored on determines how we choose at the many junctures we face.

Refuse.  Moses refused to be known as royalty, even though life would have been a lot easier.  Choose.  Moses chose to be mistreated rather than to to enjoy the fleeting pleasures of sin.  Consider.  Other words  for ‘consider’ are to think carefully about, to contemplate, to deem or to judge.  There’s the value judgment part–you have to weigh which thing pleases God, which doesn’t, or what has more eternal implications.  Moses deemed that the scorn of being a God follower was better in the end.  

Look.  Moses was looking ahead to the reward.  Looking ahead demands short term self denial and not immediate gratification.  It’s called delayed gratification.  One day there will be a reward for that.  See.  Moses somehow saw Him who was invisible.  That God revelation had to have started even before the burning bush, and it continued throughout the difficult days of getting to the Promised Land.

 


True Faith

True Faith.png

By faith Abraham obeyed when he was called to go out to a place that he was to receive as an inheritance.  And he went out, not knowing where he was going.  Hebrews 11:8

In this chapter of Hebrews, titled by many as “The Faith Hall of Fame,” the words “by faith” appears at least twenty times.  Hebrews 11:6 announces, “Without faith it is impossible to please God,”  and goes on to tell about this faith, using Biblical characters as examples to define what this faith looks like for us.  These real life people died without receiving what was promised, they only welcomed them from afar…they were aliens and strangers with their eyes on a Heavenly city…they were men made strong out of weakness who conquered kingdoms and shut the mouth of lions…they regarded disgrace for the sake of Christ as greater treasures than all of Egypt.

As a result of this  faith that was planted in their hearts by God, they didn’t receive rewards and notoriety here.  No pats on the back.  Instead, they were sawn in two, faced jeers and flogging and were imprisoned.  They were men and women of whom the world was not worthy of.  

True faith rises up within us as a work done in our hearts by God.  According to Colossians 1:5-6 it springs up like a seed.   You will  know it is there when you find yourself doing things you wouldn’t normally do, like loving unlovable people or being sacrificial with your time and money when that’s not normally you.  We nurture this faith by being connected to Jesus through prayer and Bible study, as well as being spurred on by fellow believers.

Sometimes what we do seems pretty unnoteworthy, only to later find out that our act started off a chain of events much bigger than our little step of faith. I don’t think we have to do things to prove that we have faith, we just have to obey each day, doing the things you think that God is telling you to do.  

This is an excerpt of a story that I’ve thought about a few times since I read it 25 or more years ago.  It is about Boris Kornfeld, and Charles Colson told about him in his great book, “Loving God.”  He is one of my heros of the faith, maybe somewhere in the 100th edition of God’s ‘Faith Hall of Fame.’

Kornfeld was a prisoner in the Gulag of Russia back in the 1950’s.  He was a self righteous Jew, but his life was changed by God as he was around a fellow prisoner who was a believer. He would recite the Lord’s prayer many times a day.  This man shared with Boris about being a Christian and how to forgive others because we’ve been forgiven by God.

Kornfeld was a surgeon and they put his skills to work, serving as the prison doctor.  He was doing a surgery on a guard who was particularly mean.  He could have simply sutured his vein in such a way that the man would bleed to death.  Startled by his own evil heart, he found himself reciting the Lord’s prayer as if out of the blue.  He became a Christian.  The man who told him about Jesus was transferred and Kornfeld was left to figure his faith out alone in this dank prison.  One day the doctor was performing a surgery on a cancer filled prisoner. As he worked on him through the night, he felt the words of faith tumble from his mouth as he told this man about how he had strangely, but surely, found the forgiveness and the love of God.  

The next morning, the young patient awoke to the sound of running feet.  Though it looked like Dr. Kornfeld and the patient were alone, someone overheard.  This person dealt eight blows to Kornfeld’s head, killing him.  But his faith lived on.  The patient was a writer, Alexander Solzhenitsyn.  He became a Christian through that encounter, and he began writing essays that were somehow circulated throughout the world to expose others about the inhumanity of the Soviet System.

Read more on his story from https://kazakhnomad.wordpress.com/tag/dr-boris-kornfeld/

That’s what true faith does.  Against all odds we take risks, head into situations that we don’t know what the outcome will be, quit jobs when it doesn’t look prudent to do so, and dream dreams about what God will do in and through us when we simply obey.

Won’t it be fun to hear the rest of the stories and see our own story unfold when we get to glory?

*Image from pastorjohnmerrit.com

 

 

 

 


Consider this…

Image result for consider

Let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day drawing near.  Hebrews 10:24-25

Consider:  To think about carefully, with regard to taking some action; to take into account; to regard or treat in an attentive or kindly way; to gaze on steadily or reflectively  (From the Merriam-Webster Dictionary).

What if we got up everyday and considered how to encourage others and to stir them up to love and good deeds?  I am usually thinking and praying about everything that’s on my plate and planning about how I am going to get it all done.  I’m not really considering all of the people I’m going to see that day and how I can encourage them, just thinking about myself.

Philippians 2:3-4 tells us that we should “do nothing from rivalry or conceit, but to consider others better than ourselves.  Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others.”  There’s that word ‘consider’ again.  So what if I got up praying for the key people I live  and work with and asked God to show me how to encourage them and move them to do the same thing with the people they come in contact with?  My day might be others centered instead of self centered.   I might get less grumpy with interruptions.  It could be kind of a game to see the ripple effect, like in the movie “Pay it Forward”

How can we do that?  Pray for people that God puts on your heart, or ask Him to put people on your heart.    Ask Him to show you how to pray for them, and  to show you what to say to speak into their circumstances, and how to encourage them.  The root of the word ‘encourage’ is courage.  Hebrews 10:25 says that we should get together with the purpose of encouraging, or giving courage to, one another.  It takes courage for widows to face another lonely day,  for parents to set godly boundaries for their kids,  for bosses to make necessary decisions, or for people that are at change points to move to the unknown.

According to these verses, that’s a main reason for Christians to get together–to stir (or spur) one another on to love and good deeds, to meet together, and to encourage one another.  When you go to church, go with the mission of speaking into others’ lives.  Or have people over to your house, or meet them for coffee or actually call someone instead of just shooting texts to them.

“And all the more as you see the Day drawing near.”  ‘The Day’ is the time that Jesus comes back. Before that happens, Matthew 24 and 2 Timothy 3-4 tell us that things will get rough, when people’s love grows cold and lawlessness abounds.  The worse it gets, the more we need our Christian brothers and sisters to speak encouragement to each other.

So consider how to stir up some love and good works!  And give courage to those around you today.


Oh, Grow Up!

 

babyFor everyone who lives on milk is unskilled in the word of righteousness, since he is a child.  But solid food is for the mature, for those who have their powers of discernment trained by constant practice to distinguish good from evil.  Hebrews 5:13-14

Milk is good for newborn infants.  In fact, they scream until they get it.  But eventually, that baby grows from desiring milk to eating table food that is made into a mush.  Then  she gets little pieces of meat and moves her way to entire portions of meat.  It’s what makes her grow.  She wouldn’t just continue to drink milk up through elementary school.  She would be weak, small and malnourished.

So it is with our spiritual progression.  We need the milk of the Word, and to desire it like a baby–even scream for it.    1 Peter 2:2 states, “Like newborn infants, long for the pure spiritual milk, that by it you may grow up into salvation.”  But then we need to become more mature–doers of the Word and not just hearers, as James 1 prompts us to do.  That means we put it into practice.  And as we do, we move from needing to being taught to being the one teaching.  We’re then eating solid food and we have our senses trained by it.

 Habitually reading the Bible gives us a new mind and it gives us the spiritual sense to know what is truth and what is error.  It helps us to know the difference between right and wrong and heightens our senses to spot counterfeits.  When we do what God puts on our hearts to do, we grow in faith and in obedience.  

In 2 Timothy 3:7 Paul talked about people who “are always learning but never coming to a knowledge of the truth.”  Chances are it is because they haven’t gone to the Bible for themselves, starting with milk and working up to meat by obeying.  They may rely on teachers to interpret the Bible for them, but they don’t have the discernment to know if they are false teachers or not.  It may also be because they spend more time on Facebook than in the “Good Book,” or to spend time watching questionable TV shows.  To them it is easier to read from Oprah’s book list than it is to feast on the Word.

I hear many people say that they just can’t understand the Bible.  I think that’s a lie from Satan that they’ve picked up.  God will give you the understanding as you patiently work your way through the Bible.  Use a Children’s Bible if you have to, or an easy to read version.   With the regular practice of being nourished in the Bible you don’t need intelligence, you need obedience.  

Be a meat eater.  Read the Bible and then put it into practice.  Obey it and put away sins.   And then you will have the ability to discern between good and evil.  Do something deliberate to put your faith muscle into action, and watch God grow you.


Prayer and the Throne of Grace

throne room

Since then we have a great high priest who has passed through the heavens, Jesus, the Son of God, let us hold fast our confession.  For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin.  Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.  Hebrews 4:14-16

Picture the throne room in Heaven.  It is filled with God’s glory, power, and radiant majesty,  a holy place from which Jesus rules over the entire universe while He sits at the right hand of God (Hebrews 1:3).  Here are three things about this throne:

It is a throne of grace.   In the midst of this throne room filled with God’s majesty and power, Jesus bids us to boldly come and present our requests to Him.  This is amazing, so amazing that I can’t even wrap my mind around it.  When we need help,  Jesus, the king of the universe,  is waiting for us to come so He can give us His mercy and grace.  In fact, in Isaiah 30:18 it says, “The Lord longs to be gracious to you; therefore He will rise up to show you compassion.”  NIV  He longs for us to come to Him in prayer.  

Conversely, when we turn to someone or something else instead of to God, He rebukes us.  In 2 Chronicles 16, King Asa asked for help from the king of Syria instead of going to God for assistance.  God sent Hanani the prophet to Asa to tell him that God helped Asa in the past, so why didn’t he ask God instead of going to the king of Syria.  Hanani then said, “For the eyes of the Lord run to and fro throughout the whole earth to give strong support to those whose heart is blameless toward Him.  You have done foolishly in this, for from now on you will have wars.”

It is a throne of intercession.  Jesus can identify with our weaknesses, He knows our weaknesses and He is praying for them.  Hebrews 7:25 declares, “Consequently Jesus is able to save to the uttermost those who draw near to God through Him, since He always lives to make intercession for them.”  Jesus is not only ruling and reigning, but He is praying for us day and night.   Also, Hebrews 2:18 reads, “For because He Himself has suffered when tempted, He is able to help those who are being tempted.”  When you are confronted with your weaknesses, or are tempted to sin–call out to Jesus!  He will help you.

It is a throne of well-timed help.  According to John Piper, in his devotional “His Timing is Perfect,” Hebrews 4:16 is more literally translated, “that we may find grace for a well-timed help.”  God’s grace will not come too early or too late.

What good news to rest on as we bring our needs, our dreams, and our failures to the throne of grace in prayer!  


The Two-Edged Sword

Image result for two edged sword picture

For the word of God is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing to the division of soul and spirit, of joints and of marrow, and discerning the thoughts and intentions of the heart.  Hebrews 4:12

I have talked a lot about the power of the Word and the necessity of being in it, so I just want to testify of what the Bible has done in my life.  As I have also previously mentioned, I became a Christian through two ladies who came and taught Vacation Bible School in my little farm community.  They taught the Word of God apologetically, persistently, and clearly.  I sat on the edge of my seat as I listened to them each summer.  They came from hours away, so this was the only time I heard teaching like this.  They quoted verses as they taught and in conversation, they sang songs with verses in them, and they simply stood on the truths of the Bible.

Through these two dear ladies, Miss Evelyn and Miss LaRue, the two-edged Word sword did its work in my life.  I learned that you don’t need a lot of props, you just need the Bible.  Through their encouragement I memorized hundreds of verses.  It is what changed my life, and I saw it change other people’s lives in the same way.  

When I went away to college, I joined Inter Varsity Christian Fellowship, a campus Christian group.  Through them I was taught how to study the Bible inductively and many other things that took this love for the Bible and the passionate belief that we must base our lives on it, eat, drink and sleep with it.  I have kept Bible study journals for almost 40 years now.

I worked my summers throughout college and beyond in camping ministries.  In each of these places, I saw God use me in other kids’ lives as I taught the Bible and told them the good news about Jesus’ life, death and resurrection to pay the price for our sins and to purchase salvation for us.  I prayed with hundreds of kids to find this Jesus in their lives, just like Evelyn and LaRue did for me.

Since then, I continue with the same conviction.  I know if I teach with the Bible in my hand, God works.  I don’t get carried away with emotional or funny stories, just this living and active sword of the Spirit that changes lives.  In 2 Corinthians 4:1-2 it says that we are not to resort to manipulation or clever schemes, watering it down or panhandling it for profit.

God moved my audience from children to an evangelistic ministry in our County jail.  For over 17 years I have had the privilege of being the first person, in many cases, to introduce these dear women to Jesus and to the Bible.  The living and active word of God is doing its work in their lives.  Isaiah 55:10-11 says, “it will not return to Me empty but will accomplish that which I purpose.”


The Cure to Drifting

Fix on Jesus

Therefore, holy brothers and sisters, who share in the heavenly calling, fix your thoughts on Jesus.  Hebrews 3:1 NIV

Last time we looked at five things that contribute to drifting spiritually.  There are many more ways, knowing that the world, the flesh and the devil all work against our spiritual growth.   Since I listed five things that contribute to drifting, I’ll answer with five ways to combat the drift:

  1. Fix our thoughts, hearts and eyes on Jesus.  I love that word, “fix.”   There are several verses with the words fix and set.  Picture yourself being stuck to Jesus like glue.  You’re fixed to Him.  Colossians 3:1-3 tell us to set our minds and hearts on things above, and Hebrews 12:2 also tells us (NIV wording again) to “fix our eyes on Jesus.” It takes an intentional mindset to keep looking at Jesus in the Word, in our worship and in prayer.  Tell yourself to get your eyes and thoughts off of yourself, off of others and to fix them on Jesus.
  2. The Holy Spirit.  The good news is that we have been given the power of the Holy Spirit to work in our lives to overcome those things that pull us down and cause us to drift.  Galatians 5:16 announces, “But I say, walk by the Spirit, and you will not gratify the desires of the flesh.”  
  3. Fellowship with like minded believers.  In 2 Timothy 2:22 we are told to “flee youthful passions, to pursue righteousness, faith, love and peace, along with those who call on the Lord from a pure heart.”  That means you purposely place yourself around people who are fixed on Jesus.  If you can’t find any to hang around, then read their blogs, their books, listen to their sermons or worship songs.  
  4. Learn to worship.  Good worship music draws our thoughts and hearts to Jesus.  Don’t listen to garbage music that doesn’t do so.  Worship just doesn’t have to include singing or listening to music.  Include the Psalms in your diet.  Memorize and meditate on them.  True worship changes our affections, drawing them away from the things of the world to heavenly things.
  5. Let the Word of Christ dwell in you richly.  That means reading, studying, meditating on  and memorizing the Bible.  For me, the closest link to drifting spiritually is when I get too busy, distracted or undisciplined to be in the Word.  It means I am living my life in my own strength, in the flesh, and I am dead meat when I do that.  The verse from the hymn, “Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing” is so true: “Prone to wander, Lord I feel it; prone to leave the God I love.”  

O Lord, keep me from wandering and drifting.  Daily pull me back to Your heart.  Draw and fix my thoughts on Jesus.  Fill me with Your power to walk in the Spirit and to stick to Jesus like glue.