Tag Archives: perspective

The Cure to Drifting

Fix on Jesus

Therefore, holy brothers and sisters, who share in the heavenly calling, fix your thoughts on Jesus.  Hebrews 3:1 NIV

Last time we looked at five things that contribute to drifting spiritually.  There are many more ways, knowing that the world, the flesh and the devil all work against our spiritual growth.   Since I listed five things that contribute to drifting, I’ll answer with five ways to combat the drift:

  1. Fix our thoughts, hearts and eyes on Jesus.  I love that word, “fix.”   There are several verses with the words fix and set.  Picture yourself being stuck to Jesus like glue.  You’re fixed to Him.  Colossians 3:1-3 tell us to set our minds and hearts on things above, and Hebrews 12:2 also tells us (NIV wording again) to “fix our eyes on Jesus.” It takes an intentional mindset to keep looking at Jesus in the Word, in our worship and in prayer.  Tell yourself to get your eyes and thoughts off of yourself, off of others and to fix them on Jesus.
  2. The Holy Spirit.  The good news is that we have been given the power of the Holy Spirit to work in our lives to overcome those things that pull us down and cause us to drift.  Galatians 5:16 announces, “But I say, walk by the Spirit, and you will not gratify the desires of the flesh.”  
  3. Fellowship with like minded believers.  In 2 Timothy 2:22 we are told to “flee youthful passions, to pursue righteousness, faith, love and peace, along with those who call on the Lord from a pure heart.”  That means you purposely place yourself around people who are fixed on Jesus.  If you can’t find any to hang around, then read their blogs, their books, listen to their sermons or worship songs.  
  4. Learn to worship.  Good worship music draws our thoughts and hearts to Jesus.  Don’t listen to garbage music that doesn’t do so.  Worship just doesn’t have to include singing or listening to music.  Include the Psalms in your diet.  Memorize and meditate on them.  True worship changes our affections, drawing them away from the things of the world to heavenly things.
  5. Let the Word of Christ dwell in you richly.  That means reading, studying, meditating on  and memorizing the Bible.  For me, the closest link to drifting spiritually is when I get too busy, distracted or undisciplined to be in the Word.  It means I am living my life in my own strength, in the flesh, and I am dead meat when I do that.  The verse from the hymn, “Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing” is so true: “Prone to wander, Lord I feel it; prone to leave the God I love.”  

O Lord, keep me from wandering and drifting.  Daily pull me back to Your heart.  Draw and fix my thoughts on Jesus.  Fill me with Your power to walk in the Spirit and to stick to Jesus like glue.

 


Itching Ears

For the time is coming when people will not endure sound teaching, but having itching ears they will accumulate for themselves teachers to suit their own passions, and will turn away from listening to the truth and wander off into myths.  2 Timothy 4:3-4

The last days.  Have you heard of them?    Those are the times before Jesus returns to the earth.  It sure feels like the last days, doesn’t it? The last days are what Paul described in 2 Timothy 3-4.  In Matthew 24, Jesus talked about wars and rumors of war, lawlessness increasing and peoples’ love growing cold.  He said that was just the beginning of birth pangs.  In other words, this could go on for awhile and get much worse.

George Barna, a Christian researcher and pastor, published a book in Sept. of 2016 called America at the Crossroads.  In it he explained the difference between fads and trends.  A fad is something that comes and goes in popularity, like leg warmers or Cabbage Patch Dolls.  A trend is something that impacts the culture and causes a shift that lasts.  I would say a recent cultural trend, or shift, came about when Bruce Jenner launched the headline, “Call Me Kaitlyn.”  That was an event that swung many other cultural pieces into motion.

itching2.jpgMoving away from God and toward evil is a trend that will only continue. It is interesting that the reason Paul gave for this trend is because people will have itching ears and will act to suit their passions.   It’s already happening.  People with itching ears don’t want to hear Biblical truth because it might pinpoint a sin habit that they either haven’t come face to face with, or one that they are currently engaged in and don’t want to quit.  They find a different place to go that suits their passions.  Or, as statistics show us, they stop going to church all together.

Part of our itching ears has to do with short attention spans, a consumer based view of what people want in a church, and a make-your-own-sundae approach to belief systems. Barna wrote about how people aren’t just picking and choosing from Biblical truths to form their worldview, but they are gleaning things from the Koran, some from Buddhism, others from New Age principles.  That’s called syncretism.

At least we’ve been warned, so as to not be surprised by any of it.   That’s one of the reasons why Paul wrote what he did to Timothy and to us.  Another purpose is so that we stand firm and not water down the truth to make it easier to handle.  Stand firm in what you firmly believe and have been taught, and don’t let your ears itch.  In the next verses in 2 Timothy 4, Paul admonishes: “Be serious about everything, endure hardship, do the work of an evangelist, fulfill your ministry.”

We may or may not be in the last days.  But we can be in our own last days, recognizing that our own lifespan is just a vapor and a mist.  Make the most of them.


More on fighting the good fight of faith

Benaiah the son of Jehoiada was a valiant man of Kabzeel, a doer of great deeds.  He struck down two ariels (mightiest warriors) of Moab.  He also went down and struck down a lion in a pit on a day when snow had fallen.  And he struck down an Egyptian, a handsome man.  The Egyptian had a spear in his hand, but Benaiah went down to him with a staff and snatched the spear out of the Egyptian’s hand and killed him with his own spear.  These things did Benaiah the son of Jehoiada, and won a name beside the three mighty men.   2 Samuel 23:20-23

Benaiah-600x600.jpg I stumbled on this quirky account the other day in my Bible reading.   It has caused my mind to go in many directions.  Here is this guy who probably wasn’t on the motivational speaker circuit.  Benaiah just did mighty things.  He struck down two of Moab’s mightiest warriors and a handsome Egyptian.  And he followed a lion into a pit on a snowy day and killed him.

In 1 Chronicles 11:23 the story about the Egyptian is told as well, adding the detail that he was 7 ½ feet tall.  So Benaiah killed a giant and was a lion chaser.  That’s a pretty good resume.  Because of his exploits, he got to be one of King David’s body guards.  We might not have giants and lions to contend with, but we have figurative ones that are just as daunting.  Benaiah didn’t run away from danger, he took it on and won.  I want to be that kind of person.

I’ve often thought that when David fought Goliath, he might have looked right over his nine foot tall head to see a mighty angel that was twenty feet tall, or even God almighty who is taller yet.  He didn’t see the size of the enemy, just the size of his God.  When the twelve spies went into the Promised Land, ten of them came back saying there were giants and called them to not take the land.   Caleb and Joshua didn’t have their eyes on the giants, but on their God who was bigger than the giants.  In fighting against the world, our flesh and the devil, we need the same view of our big God.  We need a mindset that sees the sufficiency of God rather than the size of our opposition.

Also, in a study done about grit by Angela Duckworth at Harvard, she found that the most prominent contributing factor in successful people wasn’t how smart, talented, or rich a person was.  The biggest factor was grit.  Grit is a dogged determination that never quits.  Grit is the bounce that enables us to get back up when we’re knocked down.  To fight a good fight we need faith, we need grit.

Finally, to fight the good fight,  we need obedience.  That’s how we can call it a ‘good’ fight, and not a dirty one, a crooked one, or one that took short cuts.

I want to be a lion chaser, one that kills giants, not a quitter, a coward or a cheater.  How about you?


Confidence in God’s enabling power

Image result for 2 Thessalonians 3:5

The Lord is faithful.  He will establish you and guard you against the evil one.  And we have confidence in the Lord about you, that you are doing and will do the things that we command.  May the Lord direct your hearts to the love of God, and in the steadfastness of Christ.  2 Thessalonians 3:3-5

In the midst of all of our up’s and down’s, our stupid choices, our rebellion and disobedience, we can take heart in knowing a few things.  May your heart be encouraged with them today.  Let’s take a look at truths that we can be bolstered by, one by one:

  1. God is faithful.  What He says He will do.  What He promises is true.  We can trust God and we can trust His promises.  The things that are in the Bible are true.  They aren’t just made up to make you feel better.  God has follow through and consistency, unlike our best intentions, or the best intentions of others who we put our faith in, only to be let down.  Philippians 1:6 is one of those faithful promises: I am sure of this, that He who began a good work in you will bring it to completion at the day of Jesus Christ.
  2. God will establish you.  That means that God will make you strong and able to maintain spiritual growth.  God will finish the work He started in you, God will give you the strength and the ability to stand and to grow.   Paul had confidence that God would keep the Thessalonians strong because God kept Paul strong.  I have confidence that God will keep a hold of you with His righteous right hand (Isaiah 41:10), because He has done that for me, even in the worst times.
  3. God guards us against Satan.  Now that’s good news.  As you read through the Psalms, you will see that David says over and over again that God is his refuge, his shield and his protector.  Just as David had physical enemies that were always trying to do him in, we have spiritual enemies that try to do the same to us.  We might not even realize that the struggles we are having are because of Satan’s schemes at work against us.  Whether we realize it or not, God guards us.
  4. If we belong to Jesus we will grow in our obedience to Him.  God does this in us because He is at work in us.  Philippians 2:13 states: It is God who works in you, to will and to work for His good purpose.  Paul could say he had confidence that they would be obedient because he had confidence in how God works in our lives.
  5. We can rest in the love of God and the steadfastness of Jesus.  Paul prayed in Ephesians 3 that we would know how high and deep and wide and long the love of Christ is because we are rooted and grounded in love.  You are loved with an overwhelming love and nothing can separate you from that love.  Jesus now sits at God’s right hand, ruling and holding the world together.  And more good news: He also kneels for us according to Hebrews 7:25, He lives to make intercession for us.

Be encouraged today, knowing that God is at work in you.  He is faithful and will protect you from Satan’s attempts to discourage and to derail you.  You are loved by God and that love never changes.  

Rest in God’s enabling power and call on Him to work in your life today.


Let peace be your umpire

Let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts, to which indeed you were called in one body.  umpire safe.jpgAnd be thankful.  Colossians 3:15

The first thing to notice here is that it reads that the peace of Christ should rule in your hearts. That suggests that the peace of Christ should be the ruler collectively in the body of Christ, not just in our own lives individually.  When there is a dispute in the body then, the prevailing rule of the thumb should be figuring out what will benefit peace and not cause strife, conflict, or division.  Sometimes it is so easy to get fired up about what truth is at stake that peace loses out.  Ephesians 4:3 backs this up.  Paul writes, “(be) eager to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace. “

The word for “rule” is the only time it is used in the New Testament. What it refers to is an Olympic judge; the guy that would award a medal or disqualify an athlete from his prize. This guy was the umpire. You can argue all you want but the umpire is the one that gets to make the call.  (cited from http://www.mikeleake.net)  Peace is the umpire.  If peace is sacrificed, then drop it.

You may think important things might get diminished, or compromised.  But yet, it seems like most rifts aren’t about whether or not Jesus is the only way to God or other crucial doctrinal tenants.  Most conflicts are over hurt feelings, pride, jealousy or matters of preference.   If I am growing in the Lord and able to look beyond my own interests, then I should be able to let someone else’s opinion or preference win out.  Keeping peace is so much more important than me being right or getting my way.  That’s the more mature option.

It is easier to take that option if you have learned to let the peace of Christ rule in your own life.  James 3:14-18 reads, But if you have bitter jealousy and selfish ambition in your hearts, do not boast and be false to the truth.  This is not the wisdom that comes down from above, but is earthly, unspiritual, demonic.  For where jealousy and selfish ambition exist, there will be disorder and every vile practice.  But the wisdom that is from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, open to reason, full of mercy and good fruits, impartial and sincere.  And a harvest of righteousness is sown in peace by those who make peace.

There are some Christians that have chaos ruling their lives, not peace.  It could stem from having jealousy and selfish ambition that are not surrendered to God.  There is most likely bitterness and pride that needs to get renounced.  Those people are difficult to be around because they aren’t  aware that the real problem isn’t what everyone is doing to them, but what their own bitterness and jealousy is doing.  Disorder results.

And be thankful!  Thankful people are hard to bring down.  They are quick to point out the things we have in common, rather than to focus on the dividing points in the body.  Thankful people are the opposite of those who have bitter jealousy and selfish ambition. Are you thankful?

Take a look inside and see if you have surrendered all of your bitter jealousy and selfish ambition to the Lord so that the peace of Christ can be the umpire in your heart.

 


Dress for Success

put off, put on.jpgPut on then, as God’s chosen ones, holy and beloved, compassionate hearts, kindness, humility, meekness, and patience, bearing with one another and, if one has a complaint against another;  forgiving each other, as the Lord has forgiven you, so you also must forgive.  Colossians 3:12-13

Paul tells us to put on compassion, kindness, etc. He doesn’t tell us to ask God to work that in us.  It is something we must do.    This idea of putting on and putting off has been mentioned before by Paul.  In Ephesians 4:22, 24  he commands us, through the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, to “Put off your old self…and to put on the new self, created after the likeness of God in true righteousness.”

Earlier in Colossians 3 Paul gave a list of what to put away: sexual immorality, impurity, passion, evil desire and greed.  But wait, there’s more!  Anger, wrath, malice, slander, obscene talk and telling lies.   I get depressed looking at what I need to put off, just like I would feel if I just tried to stop all of my bad habits and only focused on that.

In Romans 13:14  Paul simply says to “put on the Lord Jesus Christ.”  We are believers and we need to dress like it, and to fight like it.  Galatians 3:27 says, “For as many of you as were baptized into Christ have put on Christ.”  Putting on Christ has  already been done for us.  But Colossians 3 instructs us to daily put on and put off a lot of things.  I like the symbolism, but it gets tricky in figuring out how to do it.

My answer:  In Ephesians 6 we’re told to put on the armor of God.  We do that in prayer, trusting that as we say each piece it is arming our spirit man with a helmet, breastplate and the rest.  Then  I am dressed to do battle for the day.  We are in a spiritual war.  Our battle is not only Satan, but it is against our own fleshly desires that wage war against our soul, as 1 Peter 2:11 puts it.  It is a battle to put off anger, wrath, malice and slander and to instead put on compassion, humility and patience.  It takes an active response to send away bitter thoughts and resentments and to choose to forgive.  In doing that, I am putting on forgiveness.

As I drive to work most days, I pray and consciously put on compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience.  I pray through what I know is ahead of me and think of the people I need to talk to or address something with.  I pray that God would work His love through me, as well as His wisdom and creativity in situations where I am stuck.  When I am consciously pursuing a healthy diet, I must put down the chips and pick up the veggies.  It’s a mindset that we must cultivate in both situations.

We belong to God, we are holy and dearly loved, and we must actively take a hold of the life that befits a child of God.  Today, put off the habits of the sinful nature.  Tell them to get lost.  Now, put on kindness, compassion, gentleness, forgiveness and love.

 


Do your prayers sound like this?

growth

And so, from the day we heard, we have not ceased to pray for you, asking that you may be filled with the knowledge of His will in all spiritual wisdom and understanding, so as to walk in a manner worthy of the Lord, fully pleasing to HIm.  Colossians 1:9-10a

Most of the time my prayers do not sound like  Paul’s prayers.  But when I really want to see someone grow in their Christian life, I borrow these words.  They really distill what we need to have to make it spiritually.  And when I’m stuck on how to pray for myself, I do the same.  Let’s take his prayer apart:

Being filled with the knowledge of God’s will.  According to quora.com, the average adult makes around 35,000 choices a day.  Just try to order a sandwich from “Subway” and you’ll notch about 30 choices.  It would be really nice to get a little note from God with our directions for the day.  Instead of getting that, we get the Holy Spirit who is always with us to guide us.  God, direct me today so I know I’m doing what You want me to do.

In all spiritual wisdom and understanding.   Just this last week I encountered a situation with a difficult parent where I needed God’s wisdom regarding how to respond to her bullying and berating.  I asked God for understanding what she really is angry at and how to stop butting heads with her.  God is not like a magic eight ball that gives immediate answers, but I trust that He will speak ideas into my heart and mind as I proceed.  Take your most difficult situation that is facing you and ask God for His wisdom and understanding.  

So as to walk in a manner worthy of the Lord.  In the movie “Saving Private Ryan,” the character played by Tom Hanks, Captain Miller,  dies in his mission to save Private Ryan, the only son left in his family.  James Ryan went back to Normandy to Captain Miller’s grave.  Ryan stood by his grave and said, My family is with me today. They wanted to come with me. To be honest with you, I wasn’t sure how I’d feel coming back here. Every day, I think about what you said to me that day on the bridge. I’ve tried to live my life the best I could. I hope it was enough. I hope that at least in your eyes I’ve earned what all of you have done for me.” (From http://www.thesource4ym.com/movieclipdiscussions)

We don’t have to earn anything related to what Jesus has done for us.  That’s what grace is all about.  Private Ryan  felt a strong gratitude and had a  sense of purpose in life because of the sacrifice made for him.   We need to live our lives with a different purpose and sense of value because we know that Jesus  gave up His life for us.

Fully pleasing to Him.  If we do something that God instructs us to do, then we’ll be pleasing to Him.  That’s what obedience is.  If we don’t do something that we know God has commanded us not to do, the same is true.  If you want to please God, obey Him.  That’s what Samuel told King Saul in 1 Samuel 15:22, “Has the Lord as great delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices, as in obeying the voice of the Lord?  Behold to obey is better than sacrifice.”

May you be filled with the knowledge of God’s will today,  along with gaining wisdom and understanding from His Holy Spirit who is at work in you.  May God direct your steps and give you ideas, creativity and skill that comes from Him.  May you walk differently because you belong to Jesus, being filled with gratitude because of His sacrifice for you.  And may you please God by being obedient to Him.   May you turn from sinful ways and delight in doing things God’s way.  


Jesus Came Forward

Jesus' arrest.jpg

So Judas, having procured a band of soldiers and some officers from the chief priests and the Pharisees went there with weapons and torches.  Then Jesus, knowing all that would happen to Him, came forward, and said to them, “what do you seek?”  John 18:3-4

In reading Greg Morse’s blog on April 12, 2017 from “Desiring God,” I was struck with these thoughts:

Jesus had just finished His final words with the disciples in the Upper Room and the Garden of Gethsemane, as well as His big prayer with the Father.  “He knew His hour had come,” as John 13:1 states.  For most of the last three years Jesus had been saying, “My hour has not come,” like in John 2:4 and John 7:6, 8.  Judas brought the band of soldiers to arrest Him.  Jesus knew the Old Testament, so He knew what was going to happen.  Isaiah 53 could have been playing in the background.

Jesus was fully human (a mystery) and knowing what was ahead, He still came forward.  In the Garden He had prayed, “Father if You are willing, remove this cup from Me.  Nevertheless, not My will, but Yours be done,” from Luke 22:42.  In verse 44 we find that “He prayed so earnestly that His sweat became like great drops of blood falling on the ground.”  Jesus knew that He was going to be the Passover lamb and that,  in taking on the sin of the world, He would be separated from the Father.

Yet He came forward.  I would want to either hide or to fight.  Not Jesus.

  • He came forward with boldness. “‘Whom do you seek?’  They answered Him, ‘Jesus of Nazareth.’ Jesus said to them, ‘I am He.’”  John 18:4-5
  • He came forward willingly: “No one takes My life from Me, but I lay it down on My own accord.”  John 10:18
  • He came forward doggedly: “Looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before Him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is seated at the right hand of God.”  Hebrews 12:2
  • He came forward at the right time: “For while we were weak, at the right time Christ died for the ungodly.”  Romans 5:6
  • He came forward for us: “Since therefore we have been justified by His blood, much more shall we be saved by Him from the wrath of God.  For if while we were enemies we were reconciled to God by the death of His Son, much more, now that we are reconciled, shall we be saved by His life.”  Romans 5:9-10
  • He came forward in love: “In this is love, not that we have loved God, but He loved us and sent His Son to be the propitiation for our sins.”  1 John 4:10

In light of this, it is our time to come forward:

  • To no longer live for ourselves: “Therefore knowing the fear of the Lord, we persuade others…for the love of Christ controls us because we have concluded this: that One has died for all…that those who live might no longer live for themselves but for Him who for their sake died and was raised…therefore we are ambassadors for Christ.”  2 Corinthians 5:11-20
  • To deny ourselves and to be bold for Jesus: “If anyone would come after Me, let him deny Himself and take up his cross daily and follow Me.  For whoever would save His life would lose it, but whoever loses his life for My sake will save it.  For whoever is ashamed of Me and My words will the Son of Man be ashamed when He comes in glory.   Luke 9:23-26
  • To proclaim His excellencies: “But you are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for His own possession, that you may proclaim the excellencies of Him who called you out of darkness into His marvelous light.” 1 Peter 2:9

*Photo from lds.org


My ‘I can’ statement

I canI can do all things through Him who strengthens me.  Philippians 4:13

In education we have learning targets and then put them into what we call ‘I can’ statements to guide the lesson.  Teachers are to clearly state it at the beginning of the lesson and the goal is for the students to know what it is they are learning so they can check for themselves whether they got it or not.  An example in math might be “I can multiply three digit numbers by two digit numbers.”  Then they need to demonstrate that they can indeed do that skill.

So our ‘I can’ statement for today is clearly stated: “I can do all things through Him who gives me strength.”  There are three parts to this lesson.  The first is “I can do all things,” the second “through Him,” and finally “who gives me strength.”

I can do all things.  Not some things, all things.  It’s like 2 Corinthians 9:8, “God is able to make all grace abound to you, so that having all sufficiency in all things at all times, you may abound in every work.”  If you read Philippians 4:10-20, you’ll see that Paul was saying that he could do all things in the context of him being content in any circumstance.  He knew what it was like to be well fed and what it was like to be hungry.  He had learned the secret of surviving both good and bad times.  What was his secret?

Through Christ.  Paul didn’t say “I can do all things because ‘I’m smart,’ or ‘I’m strong, ‘or ‘because we all have an indomitable human spirit.’  No, Paul learned the secret of relying on Jesus for his contentment,  his strength, energy and his reason for living.  In Colossians 1:29 Paul wrote that he struggled with all of Jesus’ energy which worked so strongly in him.  In Philippians 3:10 Paul declared that his sole purpose was to know Christ and in sharing in HIs sufferings Paul would know the power of His resurrection.  John 15:5 says, “Apart from Me you can nothing.”  Ask God to show you how to access His energy and His power, not to rely on your own, which eventually (or quickly) fails.

Apart from Jesus we can do nothing.  With Jesus we can do anything.

Who gives me strength.  I was quoting these verses from Psalm 18 to myself this morning as I drove to work: “I love you, O Lord, my strength,” vs. 1; “For by You I can run against a troop, and by my God I can leap over a wall,” vs. 29; “God equips me with strength and makes my way blameless.  He trains my hands for war, so that my arms can bend a bow of bronze,” vs. 34.  People who resist the truth are wearing me down.  I am taking extra vitamins because I am worn out.  I remind myself that it is God who is my strength and I cannot give up.  I cry out to Him to renew my strength daily.

I must claim these truths each day, as you must also.  Life isn’t a cakewalk.  But we can do all things through Christ who gives us strength.

 


Overwhelming with the opposite good

Finally, brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things.  Philippians 4:8

Changing your mind from a dwelling place for any fleshly, negative and sinful  thought to an honorable one is a mind game.  Cognitive behavioral therapy centers on changing the way you think to change your actions.  The Bible certainly  advocates this, like Philippians 4:8 and others like Romans 8:5-6, “For those who live according to the flesh set their minds on the things of the flesh, but those who live according to the Spirit set their minds on the things of the Spirit.  For to set the mind on the flesh is death, but to set the mind on the Spirit is life and peace.”

I read this classic sermon given by Scottish preacher Thomas Chalmers, “The Expulsive Power of a New Affection.” (GLS Publishing)  His point is basically this: The best way of casting out an impure affection is to admit a pure one; and by the love of what is good, to expel the love of what is evil.   Chalmers continues, “ A new affection is more successful in replacing an old affection than simply trying to end it without supplanting it with something better.”  In other words, if you want to break a bad habit, find a good habit to replace it with, don’t just quit the bad habit.  

 

chalmers quoteThe phrase that sticks in my mind about getting away from  a bad habit or thought pattern is to overwhelm it with the opposite good.  So, if you want to think of things that are true, honorable, just, pure, etc. then immerse yourself in worship songs.  Or better yet, memorize Scripture.  Be radical about it.  One more quote from Chalmers: “What can not be thus destroyed, may be dispossessed–and one taste may be made to give way to another, and to lose its power entirely as the reigning affection of the mind.”  Expel the old love of your life that is fleshly and not pleasing to God with a new affection that is pleasing to God.   Overwhelm your mind with the new good thing that is set on the things of the Spirit.

A dear friend that was absorbed in many addictions became a Christian and joined a church that is radical about serving Jesus.  She expelled the old love of alcohol, some drugs,  and carousing by overwhelming her affections with a new love of fellowship with believers, studying the Bible and helping others.  This takes planning and perseverance, along with discipline and desperacy.

What negative thought or habit pattern do you need to overwhelm with the positive good today?