Tag Archives: Psalm 119:11

The Two-Edged Sword

For the word of God is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing to the division of soul and spirit, of joints and of marrow, and discerning the thoughts and intentions of the heart. Hebrews 4:12

I was just with a group of Christian friends and one was a youth leader.  He was talking about how he was challenging the high schoolers to memorize 1 John and he would shave his head if they did.  That’s what I thought I heard. But then he clarified. He said, “No, I will shave my head if they just memorize the first chapter.”  I said, “That’s only ten verses long.” He responded saying that he didn’t know if they would even do that, they’re teenagers.

My reply was that when I was a teen, I could recite over 800 verses by heart.  Another woman sitting there said, “Yea, but you were exceptional. But we appreciate having you around so when we need to know where something is found in the Bible, you can tell us.”  That statement has stuck with me.

memorizing.jpgIs that the only reason people think that they memorize Scripture?  If that is so, then they are missing the two edged sword that is at work in their lives.  Since then, I’ve been thinking that I need to come up with what memorizing has done in my life.  This is my list of benefits. I could elaborate on each of them with many examples, but for the sake of space, I won’t.

Memorizing:

  • Changes you.  Romans 12:2 tells us that we are transformed by the renewing of our minds.  Ephesians 4:17-24 also talks about this process of being renewed in the spirit of our minds and putting on the new self.  I’ve known people who have been Christians for years, but their characters are untransformed. I’m guessing that they are not in the Word much.  Memorizing Scripture takes the transformation process a step deeper because it goes with you wherever you go, enabling you to meditate on that verse throughout the day.  The Holy Spirit can speak it back to you and roll it through your mind until you get it.
  • Keeps you from sin.  That’s what Psalm 119:11 says: Thy Word have I hid in my heart that I might not sin against Thee.  I take that at face value.  Bringing up verses in the time of temptation just like Jesus did can send Satan packing.  Jesus said, “It is written” three times in the wilderness and Satan left. So say the verses you know out loud, not just to yourself.
  • Makes you fruitful.  Psalm 1 tells that if we meditate on the Word day and night we will be like a tree planted by the rivers of water that brings forth fruit in season and out of season.  Memorizing is a way to totally meditate on verses throughout the day. The Holy Spirit is able to bring words of Scripture to your mind because they have been stored up in your mind.  The promise of Psalm 1 is that if this is the pattern of your life, you will be fruitful. In other words, you will see things happen spiritually as a result of this pattern. You will see change in your own life, whether it is bad habits broken, or good habits produced.  You will also see opportunities spring up to speak those words to others, and the desire to share Jesus with others in productive ways.
  • Makes you God’s spokesperson.  Jeremiah 15:16-19 talks about this.  Jeremiah said, Thy words were found and I ate them and they became to me the joy and rejoicing of my heart.  I did not sit in the company of revelers but I sat alone because Your hand was upon me…Therefore the Lord said: ‘If you utter precious words and not worthless ones you will be as My mouth–you will be my spokesman.’  If you are like Jeremiah, spending time in intimate fellowship with God, knowing the Bible so much that you can quote it, you will be His mouth piece.  These are worthy words.

Those aren’t all of the by products of memorizing, but it’s a good start.  I know that it has kept my mind sharp. Our minds are like muscles. People say they can’t memorize, but yet they can reel off details of what they are interested in, whether it is about sports, their favorite television series that they have just binge watched, or the breed of dog that they have.  The more you use your mind muscle, the better you get with it.

So use it for the living, active and transforming Word of God that is sharper than any two edged sword and able to change your life and the lives of the people God uses you to impact.

 


Take Up Thy Swords (of the Spirit)

BT-swordThis is taken from a Desiring God post on June 13, 2017 by Greg Morse, “A Challenge to Memorize Chapters.”  It goes along with my previous post from Psalm 119:11, “Thy Word have I stored up in my heart, that I might not sin against You.”

It has resonated in my heart, perhaps finding a kindred memorizing spirit, someone who has put words to why I think memorizing is an important discipline in the Christian life:

It began in seminary.

That week, multiple professors mentioned that each student in the class ought to memorize Romans 8. I looked up Romans 8 — it was long. I had never memorized a whole chapter of the Bible before. As far as I was concerned, that wasn’t for average saints. It was for the extraordinary Christians — the kind who read Calvin in their free time and had Greek and Hebrew words tattooed on their ankles. Memorization, like Mark Twain said of the classics, is something everyone wants to have done but nobody wants to do. Maybe I could get through Psalm 23, I thought. Maybe.

But God kept after me, telling me to go to the Ninevah of memorization — I couldn’t hide.

I hobbled through the semester. After several months, I completed Romans 8 — I was astonished. I, the chief of forgetters could recite one of the greatest chapters in the Bible. And a question came to mind, if God could help me limp through memorizing Romans 8, what else could he help me memorize? My quest began there.

Daggers and Swords

I’ve learned that length of the text matters in memorizing. And, because I would have been a warmonger in another life, I think of different lengths of texts as different weapons.

Individual verses and smaller sections are daggers. Although the shortest in the soldier’s arsenal, these are for hand-to-hand combat. As in medieval times, the dagger was a last resort, a defense against ambush. Direct and to-the-point, daggers are golden promises found in Scripture to support when Satan assaults us unexpectedly. For example, in a moment of sexual temptation, “Flee!” can save your life (1 Corinthians 6:18). Every Christian soldier needs daggers.

Chapters, or larger sections of Scripture, are swords. Although longer and requiring more effort to master, swords were the medieval soldier’s most useful weapon. Swords were offensive, and carried by those expecting war. Broad swords (texts), are not only made up of daggers, but sharpen each dagger with context. The chapter draws you into the author’s thoughts, and makes greater, deeper sense of the individual verses. A dagger will save your life in a vulnerable moment, but you wouldn’t head into war without a sword. Memorizing chapters prepares us to go on the offensive against the enemy’s ranks.

Take Up Your Swords

My challenge concerns swords. Though daggers have vital uses, I challenge readers to memorize chapters of the Bible for at least four reasons:

1. Swords are not easily forgotten. The silver of memorization comes from the initial steps in memorization; the gold comes from sustaining it. When I only have daggers, I often forget I have them, and don’t revisit them consistently. I remember that I have memorized 39 verses in Romans 8, but I would forget that I memorized 39 individual daggers from all over the Bible. Memorizing chapters helps me remember what I’ve memorized so that I can review.

2. Swords help create discipline. Swords are the baby-bear of Christian memorization: not too short (dagger), but not too long (a whole book which we might call a spear). As we memorize longer sections of Scripture, we are forced to move last week’s verses from short-term to long-term memory. Long sections of Scripture cannot be memorized without discipline.

3. Swords arm us to love each other better. Although often neglected, God calls us to study those in our lives that we might stir them up to love and good works (Hebrews 10:24). After studying them, larger sections of Scripture can become a trustworthy playbook for love.

4. Swords make God’s word mobile. Mornings can get hectic. The best intentions can be interrupted by a screaming child, a distressing phone call, or a snoozed alarm. On such days, I can’t pull out my Bible and study the text on my way to work. But I can meditate on chapters I’ve memorized. Swords are the ideal length for ten to fifteen minutes of extended meditation.

How to Pick Your Swords

So how do you pick what to memorize? I suggest the following:

Pick chapters that aim at specific sin struggles. If busyness tempts you, memorize John 15. If adultery tempts you, memorize Proverbs 5. If apathy to the word tempts you, memorize Psalm 1. Pick specific swords to decapitate your sin.

Pick chapters that will minister to particular people in your life (see number three above).

Pick chapters that more explicitly display God’s majesty. One way to consistently pop the helium balloon of your own ego is to memorize texts that behold your God. Texts like Isaiah 40 or Revelation 5 humble the creature before his Creator.

Pick chapters that remind you of the life to come. Select swords that remind you that you are not home. Linger with founding pilgrims in Hebrews 11 or catch a glimpse of that coming day in Revelation 21.

Pick chapters that have gripped you. The Spirit grips individuals in specific ways. People have life-verses. I believe in having life-chapters. If the story of the prodigal son grips you, do not let it linger outside your heart as the elder brother, memorize it and bring it into your home.

A Glorious Army

Dream with me: What if every saint had two or three chapters written on their heart? What if everyone in your church or small group had two or three different swords ready for battle — to war against Satan and to strengthen the brothers and sisters fighting next to them? A member who lived by the still waters of Psalm 23 and beckoned others to come and sit. One who constantly abided in Jesus the Vine of John 15, and bid others to daily receive the same nourishment. One who taught the group how to bid sinners to come and drink freely from the wells of living waters as they remained submerged in Isaiah 55. What might that be like?

The Challenge

I’ve been encouraged by such saints and challenge you to be one.

One of my favorite spiritual questions to ask over the past two years has been: If you could memorize five chapters of the Bible, which five would you choose and why? You can learn a lot about someone and spur great conversations through this question. After the excitement rises with the prospect of memorizing five, I simply ask, why don’t you do it? Some roll their eyes, but some have embarked on the quest.

Now I extend the challenge to you. If you have never memorized a chapter, the challenge is to start with one. If you have a habit of memorizing, pick three and write them on your heart. The challenge: over a lifetime, write and sustain five different chapters (or longer sections of Scripture) on your heart.

There are my thoughts again: I went to a funeral in Greg’s church.  It was for a young couple’s baby who only lived several days.  I was expecting a mourning, defeated and grieving time.  Instead, I was met with a group of triumphant, expectant, Scripture quoting believers who held on by faith that God had something in store for this young couple.  One by one, twenty something friends stood up and quoted verses of hope in their prayers during the service.  It was an amazing service!  Those  believers had their swords ready for battle and they pulled them out, ready for use on that day.  It was a glorious army.